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Food Stamps: Four Significant SNAP Changes Are Expected by 2024

Bylima

Dec 31, 2023
Food Stamps: Four Significant Snap Changes Are Expected by 2024

The biggest federal nutrition assistance program is called Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Eligible low-income individuals and families can receive benefits through this program by using an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card.

The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) claims that SNAP enhances food security, provides benefits that allow families to purchase healthier diets, and frees up resources that can be used for health-promoting activities and necessary medical care. SNAP is administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service.

According to the CBPP, “SNAP reduces the prevalence of food insecurity overall by as much as 30% and is even more effective among children and those with [children].”

At the start of every federal fiscal year, the USDA modifies the maximum allotments for SNAP, the deductions allowed, and the income eligibility requirements. The department states that the adjustments are based on variations in the cost of living, or the amount of money required to maintain a minimal standard of living and that the fiscal year officially begins on October 1.

Although SNAP benefits were raised last month, eligibility requirements will also be altered as a result of the Fiscal Responsibility Act (FRA), which President Joe Biden signed into law in June.

Age and Eligibility

The USDA refers to this time limit as “able-bodied adults without dependents” (ABAWD), but the FRA adds new categories of people who are exempt from it and gradually raises the age of ABAWDs.

Before September, there were work requirements for ABAWDs aged 18 to 50. These requirements included working a minimum of 80 hours per month, taking part in a work program for a minimum of 80 hours per month, or combining work and work program hours for a total of at least 80 hours per month.

According to the USDA, these work requirements increased to 52 as of October 1 and will increase to 54 as of October 2024.

Exclusivity

The USDA states that there are a few exceptions to the ABAWD work requirements.

For example, you are exempt if you are pregnant, a veteran, homeless, unable to work because of a physical or mental disability, or if you are 24 years of age or younger and in foster care on your 18th birthday.

Eligibility for Income

If your gross monthly income does not exceed the following threshold (130 percent of the federal poverty level), you are qualified for SNAP benefits.

Household Size: $1,580

48 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, and the Virgin Islands

$1,973 in Alaska

Hawaii: $1,817

Family Size: $2,137

48 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, and the Virgin Islands

$2,670 in Alaska

Hawaii: $2,457

Size of Household: 3

District of Columbia, Guam, Virgin Islands, and the 48 States: $2,694

Alaska: $3,366

Hawaii: $3,098

Size of Household: 4

$3,250 for the 48 states, DC, Guam, and the Virgin Islands

$4,063 in Alaska

Hawaii: $3,738

Size of Household: 5

$3,807 for the 48 States, DC, Guam, and the Virgin Islands

Alaska: $4,760

Hawaii: $4,378

Size of Household: 6

District of Columbia, Guam, Virgin Islands, and the 48 States: $4,364

$5,456 in Alaska

Hawaii: $5,018

Size of Household: 7

District of Columbia, Guam, Virgin Islands, and the 48 States: $4,921

Alaska: $6,153

Hawaii: $5,659

Size of Household: 8

District of Columbia, Guam, Virgin Islands, and the 48 States: $5,478

$6,849 in Alaska

Hawaii: $6,299

Every Extra Participant

Virgin Islands, Guam, the District of Columbia, and the 48 States: $557

Alaska: $697

Hawaii: $641

Maximum Contributions
Maximum allotments have increased for the 48 contiguous states, the District of Columbia, Alaska, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands based on the cost of living adjustments (COLA) for 2024.

For example, the maximum allotment for a family of four in the lower 48 states and Washington, D.C., is $973, whereas in Alaska, it varies from $1,248 to $1,937. In Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands, the maximum allocation for a family of four is $1,434 and $1,251, respectively.

In the meantime, Hawaii’s maximum allotments for a family of four will drop to $1,759.

As of 2023, the minimum benefit for the 48 states and Washington, D.C. remains $23.

The USDA has announced the maximum SNAP allotments for the 48 contiguous states and Washington, D.C. for the October 2023 to September 2024 period.

  • First family size: $291
  • Size of household 2: $535
  • Third-size household: $766
  • Size of household 4: $973
  • Size of household 5: $1,155
  • Size of household 6: $1,386
  • Size of household 7: $1,532
  • Size of household 8: $1,751
  • Every extra individual: $219

By lima

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